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Adidas and thredUP Team Up to Recycle Your Shoes

adidas and thredUP team up to resell your hand-me-downs

Adidas and thredUP Team Up to Recycle Your Shoes

adidas and thredUP team up to resell your hand-me-downs

The Future. adidas and thredUP are collaborating on something other than footwear — recycling. The new “Choose to Give Back” program allows customers to send in old products in exchange for points toward new ones. As adidas crafts footwear and apparel to be fully recyclable, the new program may be a perfect way to transition its current products into more sustainable items.

Re-box
Taking the time to turn in old clothes can be inconvenient, so adidas and secondhand resale platform thredUP is bringing sustainability to you.

  • The “Choose to Give Back” program allows customers to “extend the lifecycle” of the old products — including those not from adidas.
  • Users receive points for turning in items, which can be used toward new footwear or apparel.
  • It will launch both online and in stores early next year.

Here’s how it works: using the adidas app, users start a “clean out,” they then box up their footwear or clothes and then send it back with a provided pre-paid shipping label. It’s almost as easy as taking out the trash.

Waste waste
“Sustainability” has easily become the hottest trend in fashion, and for a good reason — the fashion industry is a huge polluter. A recent Ellen McArthur Foundation report found that “the equivalent of a garbage truckload of clothes is buried or burned in a landfill every second.” Yeah, that’s not sustainable.

Both adidas and thredUP have been at the forefront of scaling sustainability for the past couple of years. Earlier this year, adidas introduced its first fully-recyclable shoe — the UltraBoost “Made to be Remade” model. Meanwhile, thredUP is one of the market leaders in the Gen-Z favorite secondhand fashion revolution, which saw a 43% jump in its stock when it went public back in March.